News

“Faces of the Fallen”

 

http://www.wdef.com/news/story/Faces-of-the-Fallen/NCJUrIHqsUO7zyQH3vkoXQ.cspx

 


Fallen soldiers’ photos sought for Wall of Faces

 

http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/sumner/2014/07/22/fallen-soldiers-photos-sought-wall-faces/13003371

 


Honoring Vietnam veterans: Help us put a face on sacrifice

 

By Mark Green

Published July 14, 2014
FoxNews.com

The genius of Maya Lin’s design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial — “The Wall” — is the visitor’s overwhelming sense of loss. The names of the dead, on 140 black granite panels, appear infinite in number.

It has been 32 years since The Wall was dedicated. It has become a place of healing, where Americans could separate the sacrifice of the warriors from what had become America’s most unpopular war.

Back then, a young veteran, Jan Scruggs, took $2,000 of his own money and began raising the $8.4 million in private contributions to build what has become one of Washington’s most visited monuments, attracting 4.4 million Americans in 2011 alone, according to the Washington Examiner.

Scruggs has now embarked on a new effort, one that will enable future generations to fully appreciate the sacrifice of those who gave their lives. Scruggs’ idea is to put faces to the names at a new Education Center that will be located between The Wall and the Lincoln Memorial.

The Education Center, Scruggs hopes, will be a place where visitors will be able to remember these 58,300 men and women for what they were — living, breathing human beings, not just names carved into black granite.

The Education Center will display some of the more than 100,000 items that loved ones have placed at The Wall over the last three decades — some touching, some funny, all deeply personal.

The Center will include a multimedia presentation where, organizers hope, visitors will be able to learn more about our fallen and all they sacrificed when they gave their lives.

Scruggs is no stranger to formidable tasks, but he’s come upon an obstacle that few would have predicted.

It has now been nearly four decades since the last American died in the Vietnam War, and photographs of the fallen are getting very difficult to find. Of the 58,300 who gave their lives, organizers have been able to locate about 36,000. Unless the others are found, the faces of these brave Americans may be lost to history, forever.

Throughout the nation, in attics, scrapbooks and yearbooks, there are photographs of each of the 58,300 young men and women who died all too soon, in our name.

These brave men and women grew up in the Kodak generation. There were snapshots taken at sporting events, proms, graduations, holidays and birthday parties; home movie cameras lovingly filmed them as they opened their presents, enjoyed family barbecues, worked on their cars or ran with their dogs.

There are 1,295 Tennesseans whose names are inscribed on The Wall. I am grateful that my Tennessee Senate colleagues have joined the mission to locate the remaining 699 photos. I hope my fellow state legislators across the country will do the same in their states.

These are the photographs and films that, organizers hope, will give our children a glimpse into the lives of the names on The Wall — a window into all they left behind.

Perhaps you grew up with somebody who died in Vietnam, or knew one of these individuals in school.  If so, you can truly honor their sacrifice by taking a moment to look through your old photos and yearbooks.

If you are able to locate snapshots of a soldier who lost his or her life in Vietnam, please visit the website of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Foundation, www.vvmf.org, to submit the photo.

Your long-forgotten snapshot might ensure that generations to come will remember your friend or relative as more than just one of an infinite number of names.

Dr. Mark Green, M.D., a decorated special operations flight surgeon, is a member of the Tennessee State Senate.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2014/07/14/honoring-vietnam-veterans-help-us-put-face-on-sacrifice/

 


Senator seeks photos of Vietnam vets for memorial wall

 

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – State Senator Mark Green is seeking photos of Vietnam War veterans from Clarksville and Dover who were killed in action in order to honor the fallen heroes at The Education Center at The Wall, a new facility to be built near the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (‘The Wall’) in Washington, DC. The photos will be part of a multimedia display at The Center.

The effort in Tennessee is part of a national program by the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (VVMF) to put a face with each of the 58,300 names on ‘The Wall.’

“Every one of Tennessee’s heroes deserves to be remembered as more than just a name inscribed in granite,” said Green, “That’s why I am reaching out to my colleagues in the legislature as well as my fellow citizens in Clarksville and Dover so each name has a face and story to go with it.”
“There are 1,295 Tennesseans listed on ‘The Wall.’ We know the faces of 596 of them,” Green said. “We are looking for photos of the 699 remaining faceless heroes so that they are honored in a way they so richly deserve.”

“Somewhere, hidden among your things, there might be a photo of a real hero from the prom, the football game or a long-forgotten family barbecue,” said Green. “By sending it to be included, you’ll help preserve that hero’s face and memory for generations to come.”

Green is seeking photos for the following veterans:

Clarksville: Alvin R Stovall Jr, Army; Ernest L Brown Jr, Navy; Fred E Gold, Army; Gene O Merriweather, Marine Corps; George R Ward Jr, Marine Corps; Irvin E Martin, Army; Jack B Beers, Army; John L Sensing, Army; Robert D Jenkins, Army; Robert D Shoemaker, Army; Walter M Taylor, Army; Woodrow W Vaden, Air Force

Dover: Kenneth L Conner, Army; Stephen C Crabtree, Army

Senator Green said photos can be scanned and submitted via email to win0764@gmail.com, online at www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces or mailed to The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, Attn: Call for Photos, 2600 Virginia Avenue, NW, Suite 104, Washington, DC 20037. Please send a copy of the original photo. VVMF does not want original photos and cannot be responsible for returning photos.

To view the photos that have already been submitted or see if someone you know is among those without a photo, please visit The Wall of Faces website at www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces.

http://clarksvillenow.com/local/senator-seeks-photos-of-vietnam-vets-for-memorial-wall/#sthash.6dcWD3uu.dpuf

 

 


Green seeks to put faces and stories with names on The Wall

 

Green seeks to put faces and stories with names on The Wall

Clarksville, TN [July 15] – State Senator Mark Green is seeking photos of Vietnam War veterans from Clarksville and Dover who were killed in action in order to honor the fallen heroes at The Education Center at The Wall, a new facility to be built near the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (‘The Wall’) in Washington, DC. The photos will be part of a multimedia display at The Center.

The effort in Tennessee is part of a national program by the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (VVMF) to put a face with each of the 58,300 names on ‘The Wall.’

“Every one of Tennessee’s heroes deserves to be remembered as more than just a name inscribed in granite,” said Green, “That’s why I am reaching out to my colleagues in the legislature as well as my fellow citizens in Clarksville and Dover so each name has a face and story to go with it.”

“There are 1,295 Tennesseans listed on ‘The Wall.’ We know the faces of 596 of them,” Green said. “We are looking for photos of the 699 remaining faceless heroes so that they are honored in a way they so richly deserve.”

“Somewhere, hidden among your things, there might be a photo of a real hero from the prom, the football game or a long-forgotten family barbecue,” said Green. “By sending it to be included, you’ll help preserve that hero’s face and memory for generations to come.”

Green is seeking photos for the following veterans:

Clarksville: Alvin R Stovall Jr, Army; Ernest L Brown Jr, Navy; Fred E Gold, Army; Gene O Merriweather, Marine Corps; George R Ward Jr, Marine Corps; Irvin E Martin, Army; Jack B Beers, Army; John L Sensing, Army; Robert D Jenkins, Army; Robert D Shoemaker, Army; Walter M Taylor, Army; Woodrow W Vaden, Air Force

Dover: Kenneth L Conner, Army; Stephen C Crabtree, Army

Senator Green said photos can be scanned and submitted via email to win0764@gmail.com, online at www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces or mailed to The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, Attn: Call for Photos, 2600 Virginia Avenue, NW, Suite 104, Washington, DC 20037. Please send a copy of the original photo. VVMF does not want original photos and cannot be responsible for returning photos.

To view the photos that have already been submitted or see if someone you know is among those without a photo, please visit The Wall of Faces website at www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces.

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/viewart/20140715/NEWS01/307150022/Green-seeks-put-faces-stories-names-Wall

 


Photos sought of those killed in Vietnam

 

Standing before a half-scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, State Sen. Mark Green, MD, last week called for Tennesseans to search their photo albums for photographs of those who were killed in Vietnam.

In addition, Green implored his fellow state legislators from across the nation to join Tennessee in the search for the remaining 22,000-plus photos of Vietnam heroes.

The photos are needed for a multimedia display at the new Education Center at the Wall, a facility that will be built between the existing Wall and the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. The display, Dr. Green said, will “bring the names on ‘The Wall’ to life, to teach future generations that these were living, breathing men and women — not just names carved in granite.

“There are 1,295 Tennesseans whose names are on ‘The Wall’ in Washington, but we’ve found photos of only 596,” Green said. “In attics and scrapbooks all over Tennessee are the photos of 699 heroes who deserve to be remembered. Your snapshot will help preserve the story of an American hero for generations to come.”

Photos are needed of three local heroes, Robert D. Armstrong and Robert D. Williams, Jr., of Fayetteville and Joe H. Moorehead of Kelso. There is already a photo of another Lincoln County hero, Stanley Sullivan, who also lost his life in Vietnam.

According to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (VVMF) this is the first time a state legislature has taken on such a task.

“The photo collection is a mission my colleagues from across Tennessee and the country should take on wholeheartedly. We can honor the men and women who gave all and respect those who returned home from the Vietnam War,” Green said.

“The photo project brings a personal touch of remembrance to those Americans who served and paid the ultimate sacrifice for their country. Without the public’s help, the memory of these men and women may be forgotten,” VVMF Founder and President Jan C. Scruggs said.

The event featured remarks by retired Lieutenant General Hugh Smith, a decorated Vietnam veteran who served in high-ranking and sensitive military posts before retiring to become chief operating officer of both the Nashville International Airport and John C. Tune General Aviation.

Other dignitaries at the “Faces of Valor” rally included Senators Rusty Crowe (R-Johnson City) and Delores R. Gresham (R-Somerville); Tennessee Commissioner of Veterans Affairs Mary-Bears Grinder; former Commissioner Fred Tucker; retired General Gary E. Luck, senior advisor, U.S Joint Forces Command; retired Lieutenant Colonel Bud Guenther; retired Navy Corpsman Thurman “Doc” Mullins; and Michelle Selesky, whose father was a Vietnam veteran.

Photos of those lost in Vietnam can be submitted to Dr. Green’s office or for more information about how to submit photos to the VVMF, please visit buildthecenter.org. Dr. Green assured that original photos submitted to his office will be returned unharmed.

To view the photos that have already been submitted or see if someone you know is among those without a photo, please visit The Wall of Faces website at www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces.

Photos sought of those killed in Vietnam


Faces of Valor Rally

 

Mark Green hosts “Faces of Valor Rally” launching statewide effort to collect photos of fallen from Vietnam. Ceremony marks first time in nation whole legislative body collects photos of those with names inscribed on “The Wall”

“The Wall That Heals” in Tennessee Bicentennial Capital Park Mall State Parkwill be the solemn backdrop for the “Faces of Valor Rally.” On Thursday, June 26, State Senator Mark Green (R-Clarksville) along with his fellow senators and guests will launch a statewide effort to collect the remaining photos of all those from Tennessee who lost their lives in Vietnam.

Of the 1295 Tennesseans whose names are inscribed on “The Wall” in Washington, DC, there are 699* photos that have not yet been collected. That’s 699 faces who are known only to their family and friends and whose stories have yet to be told. Senator Green, MD, a former US Army special operations flight surgeon, has enlisted the help of his fellow senators to see that this task is completed and the stories of these heroes can be told as part of The Education Center at The Wall.

According to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, Tennessee is the first state legislature in the nation to launch this effort.

“Tennessee is ‘The Volunteer State’ and I am proud that my fellow senators are the first legislative body to seek the remaining photos of these fallen heroes,” Green said. “Our nation is still healing from the wounds of Vietnam. Many of our service men and women never received the honor and respect they deserved. Our effort with the Education Center at The Wall heals those wounds and honors the service of those we lost.”

What: Faces of Valor Rally and distribution of individual lists of remaining photos of the fallen from their respective districts to every Tennessee State Senator.

When: Thursday, June 26, 2014, 1pm CT Opening Ceremony will begin

Who: State Senator Mark Green, MD

• State Senator Rusty Crowe

• State Senator Delores Gresham

• Lt. General (Ret) Hugh Smith, keynote speaker

• Gen (Ret) Gary E. Luck, Senior Advisor, U.S Joint Forces Command

• Col (Ret) Many-Bears Grinder, Commissioner Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs

• Maj (Ret) Fred Tucker, Former Commissioner Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs

• Michelle Selesky, Daughter of Vietnam Veteran

Where: Tennessee Bicentennial Capital Park Mall State Park, Nashville, TN, 600 James Robertson Parkway, Nashville, TN

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/viewart/20140625/NEWS01/306250017/Faces-Valor-Rally


Your photos are needed to honor Vietnam veterans

I didn’t know Fred Edward Gold, and I don’t think I’ve ever met any members of his family, but he grew up in Clarksville, which I’m privileged to represent in the Tennessee Senate.

Fred’s birthday is coming up: On July 23, he’d be turning 66. On that day, he should be surrounded by family and friends — but on Sept. 22, 1969, he was killed in a combat assault in Quang Tin, Vietnam — a battle that few now remember, for a river valley that most of us couldn’t find on a map.

He was an Army corporal and had been in the country for less than six months when his unit met fierce resistance during the assault on Quang Tin. Three helicopters were shot down and, once on the ground, eight infantrymen lost their lives, including Gold.

Like the more than 58,000 other men and women who gave their lives in Vietnam, Fred grew up having hopes and dreams and had family who doubtlessly loved him. He had hobbies, interests, favorite foods. He went to school and — if he was lucky — found love.

Nevertheless, to those who visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington — what most of us know as “The Wall” — Fred Edward Gold today is just one more name carved into the black marble, a single blade of grass in a wide field of sacrifice.

This week, as a half-scale replica of The Wall visits Nashville at the Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park, it is appropriate to think about Cpl. Gold and of all those who served with him in America’s most unpopular war.

Their lives deserve to be remembered, not just their names.

Today, many of the same Vietnam veterans who first conceived of the existing memorial in Washington are now working on a project that would do just that. Plans are on the drawing board for a new education center to be located between The Wall and the Lincoln Memorial. Among other things, the center will feature a multimedia experience that will use snapshots to bring to life for future generations the faces and lives of the fallen.

It is a remarkable and worthy effort that is long overdue.

Organizers, however, have hit a snag. It has now been almost 40 years since the death of the last American in Vietnam, and photographs of all 58,300 individuals are hard to come by.

There were 1,295 men and women from our state who made the ultimate sacrifice in Vietnam; yet we can find photos or home movies of only 596. Cpl. Gold of Clarksville is one of those whose pictures we have not been able to find.

I’ve joined with Rusty Crowe, R-Johnson City, and Delores Gresham, R-Somerville, and our fellow senators in a special appeal for photos.

Many Tennesseans of a certain age knew one or more of the heroes of Vietnam; we went to high school with them or knew their parents and siblings. We’re asking folks to search their attics, scrapbooks and yearbooks for snapshots of these fallen heroes.

If you have a photo of a soldier who lost his or her life in Vietnam, please visit the website of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund’s Education Center,buildthecenter.org, to find out how to submit it, or contact my office and we’ll be happy to copy the photo; be assured, we will return the original to you unharmed.

The lives of Fred Edward Gold and thousands of other Americans were cut short because they answered the nation’s call. By helping us find their pictures, you’ll be helping ensure that they will be remembered as they were — living, breathing, vital human beings — and not just as names carved into marble.

Dr. Mark Green, M.D., is a member of the Tennessee General Assembly representing the 22nd Senate District.

http://www.tennessean.com/story/opinion/2014/06/26/photos-needed-honor-vietnam-veterans/11366387


Manna Cafe makes plea for support

CLARKSVILLE, TENN. — The menu was grits and gravy but the message was an urgent plea for increased financial support of Manna Cafe Ministries, a Clarksville food charity that has seen dramatic growth in demand for its services.

More than 100 friends and supporters of Manna Cafe Ministries gathered for a “Grits ‘n’ Gravy” fundraising breakfast Thursday morning at the Riverview Inn. The event was sponsored by state Sen. Mark Green and his company, Align MD.

A video presentation and other matekenny & Markrials showed the impact of Manna Cafe’s work. The four-year-old nonprofit organization serves more than 600 hot meals a week and distributes 1,800 food boxes each week to families from its kitchen and dining hall at 1319 Franklin St. in Clarksville.

Manna also uses Mobile Cafe and Mobile Pantry programs to take meals and food distribution to various sites around the community. The group also organized temporary shelter for the homeless during last winter’s bitter cold snaps, and has a goal to establish a permanent shelter.

Manna Cafe has a small group of paid staff supported by volunteers who devote 600 hours a week packing boxes, cooking and manning food drives to keep the operation moving forward.

Sen. Green offered an inspirational testimonial about the importance of Manna Cafe’s work, and the Scripture’s call for people of faith to help feed the hungry and lift up those in need. He urged those attending the breakfast to get involved with Manna Cafe, through prayer, direct donations and by volunteering.

Kenny York, founder of Manna Cafe, told the breakfast crowd that he was grateful for all the support that has allowed the organization to grow and increase its level of assistance to needy people in the community.

York described a scene he saw recently when he looked across the operation on a typical day. He saw a group of volunteers preparing the day’s meal that included homeless people, a man with Downs syndrome and others who had battled mental illness.

“Sometimes you can’t tell the servers from the served, and we like it like that,” York said. “The volunteers, often people who we had been helping, are a big part of our ministry.”

York also made a passionate plea for more donations and volunteerism.

“We’ve had phenomenal growth, but our finances still operate in the red most months,” York said, fighting back tears. “Recently, we’ve had trouble meeting payroll, and if we don’t improve our fundraising, we’ll be facing layoffs. I’m very grateful, but we’re in the hole. It seems we’re at a plateau, and we need to educate Clarksville about where we are.

“I look at the people getting meals, and I look at the 1,800 families getting food boxes, and I ask myself, ‘Where do they go if we go away’? I can tell you I got a lot of fight left in me, but I need your help.”

To donate, volunteer or check out coming events, visit the the organization’s website: mannacafeministries.com.

York said Manna’s next big fundraising event would be the “Color Me Cool Art Show and Ice Cream Festival” from noon to 8 p.m. Aug. 2. Described as “a groovy summer shindig with a hippie-dippy twist,” the free event open to all will feature 35 local painters, sculptors, and crafters showing and selling their creations. Purity Ice Cream will serve various flavors, and Ken Shipley will be selling handcrafted bowls to benefit Manna Café.

The festival, at 635 Frosty Morn Drive, will include live music, hula hoop and ice cream eating contests, a tie-dye theme, games for the kids, and a homemade ice cream competition.

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/article/20140619/NEWS01/306190011


AT&T expands fast 4G network to Indian Mound

INDIAN MOUND, Tenn. AT&T has activated a new 4G mobile Internet cell site in Indian Mound in Stewart County that will enhance coverage for area residents and businesses and provide speeds up to four times faster than 3G.

Customers can now enjoy 4G speeds along Hwy. 79 West in Indian Mound.

This launch is part of AT&T’s Project Velocity IP (VIP), a multi-year plan to invest for growth, announced in 2012. Through this investment, AT&T is supporting its customers’ growing desire for high-quality, fast wireless and wired services. As part of Project VIP, AT&T is deploying small cell technology, macro cells and additional DAS, which will increase the density of the wireless network. The wireless network densification will further improve network quality and increase spectrum efficiency.

“High speed wireless broadband is an important infrastructure component that will keep us competitive as we continue to promote our city around the world,” said State Senator Mark Green.

Providing access to educational resources extends beyond the walls of our schools and good wireless service, especially wireless broadband service, is vital to provide this access,” said State Representative Tim Wirgau. “Advanced technology like wireless broadband is an important tool for our students’ education and their lives.”

“Business people are no longer confined to their offices in order to perform their jobs and wireless service makes this possible,” said Stewart County Mayor Rick Joiner. “Wireless broadband service like LTE provides the connectivity and flexibility needed to conduct business from just about anywhere at anytime.”

AT&T has invested nearly $1.3 billion in its best-in-class wireless and wired networks in Tennessee between 2011 through 2013, driving a wide range of upgrades to enhance speed, reliability, coverage and performance for residents and business customers.

“Demand for wireless speed is growing rapidly, and we are excited to bring these super-fast speeds to residents and businesses in Indian Mound,” said Lanie Johnson, regional director, external affairs, AT&T Tennessee.

AT&T has deployed two compatible 4G technologies to deliver more speed to more smartphone customers, which means AT&T customers can get 4G speeds on 4G HSPA+, unlike some competitors, where smartphone customers may fall back to slower 3G technologies when outside of LTE coverage.

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/viewart/20140620/STEWART01/306200041/AT-T-expands-fast-4G-network-Indian-Mound